Park Plaza Resort - Park City, Utah, UT 84060, United States

History of Park City

Since the rise of the skiing and tourist economy, Park City houses more tourists than residents. Park City has grown through the ideals of a winter wonderland. It has become a place of fame through the 2002 Winter Olympic games and provides more attractions than ever before. In the 1950s, Utah began to feed on Park City as a mountain getaway, and not until D. James Canon promoted winter sports in Utah, with the promotional scheme of "Ski Utah" and "The Greatest Snow on Earth".[8] did many drive to see for themselves why Utah is a winter wonderland. Utah drew in over 648,000 tourists in 1970 and now a yearly average of 4 million tourists.[9] In a small town with a population of 8,000, the average number of tourists in Park City is 600,000 year. This significant increase in visitors is largely credited to promotional material that is carefully planned and distributed by the Utah Publicity and Tourist Council. Growth has accelerated in the last few decades, and Park City is now one of the most affluent and lively resort towns in the United States.

The tourist industry now contributes over 1/3 of the total economic value to the state of Utah.[10] In particular, Park City, draws in 3,006,071 average annual visitors; in the winter 1,603,775, and in the summer 1,402,296. Park City prospers from the average nightly vistor spending ranging from $100 to $350.[11] Currently, Park City primarily relies on its tourist industry from skiing to restaurants to hiking and biking. The makeover of Park City has stimulated an entirely different culture of expenditure, adventure, and wealth, and their promotional material indulges it. As the tourist economy continues to thrive through its unique terrain and mountainous luxury, the struggle for survival was lost, and created a world-renown name of touristic dominance.

As long ago as the 1920s, miners in Park City were using underground trains and shafts to gain access to the mountain for skiing. Aerial trams once used for hauling ore were converted into chairlifts. To this day, there are still more than 1000 miles (1609 km) of old silver-mine workings and tunnels beneath the slopes at Park City Mountain Resort and neighboring Deer Valley. Park City might be a fairly nondescript-appearing town were it not for its colorful and evocative Main Street, where 64 Victorian buildings are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Old mine buildings, mineshafts, and hoists, including the weathered remains of the Walker Webster Silver Mine and the water towers once used to hydrate one of the biggest mines, the Silver King, provide a hint of the history of this mining town transformed in economic upheaval into a skiing resort.

Location
A quaint mountain town with a mountain of family friendly things to do!
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